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Identification of prostate cancer biomarkers in urinary exosomes

Overview of attention for article published in Oncotarget, July 2015
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1 tweeter

Citations

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197 Mendeley
Title
Identification of prostate cancer biomarkers in urinary exosomes
Published in
Oncotarget, July 2015
DOI 10.18632/oncotarget.4851
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anders Øverbye, Tore Skotland, Christian J. Koehler, Bernd Thiede, Therese Seierstad, Viktor Berge, Kirsten Sandvig, Alicia Llorente

Abstract

Exosomes have recently appeared as a novel source of non-invasive cancer biomarkers since tumour-specific molecules can be found in exosomes isolated from biological fluids. We have here investigated the proteome of urinary exosomes by using mass spectrometry to identify proteins differentially expressed in prostate cancer patients compared to healthy male controls. In total, 15 control and 16 prostate cancer samples of urinary exosomes were analyzed. Importantly, 246 proteins were differentially expressed in the two groups. The majority of these proteins (221) were up-regulated in exosomes from prostate cancer patients. These proteins were analyzed according to specific criteria to create a focus list that contained 37 proteins. At 100% specificity, 17 of these proteins displayed individual sensitivities above 60%. Even though several of these proteins showed high sensitivity and specificity for prostate cancer as individual biomarkers, combining them in a multi-panel test has the potential for full differentiation of prostate cancer from non-disease controls. The highest sensitivity, 94%, was observed for transmembrane protein 256 (TM256; chromosome 17 open reading frame 61). LAMTOR proteins were also distinctly enriched with very high specificity for patient samples. TM256 and LAMTOR1 could be used to augment the sensitivity to 100%. Other prominent proteins were V-type proton ATPase 16 kDa proteolipid subunit (VATL), adipogenesis regulatory factor (ADIRF), and several Rab-class members and proteasomal proteins. In conclusion, this study clearly shows the potential of using urinary exosomes in the diagnosis and clinical management of prostate cancer.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 197 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Iran, Islamic Republic of 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Argentina 1 <1%
Unknown 193 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 41 21%
Student > Bachelor 31 16%
Researcher 30 15%
Student > Master 27 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 6%
Other 22 11%
Unknown 35 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 52 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 33 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 33 17%
Chemistry 14 7%
Engineering 5 3%
Other 14 7%
Unknown 46 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 August 2016.
All research outputs
#7,063,108
of 8,160,820 outputs
Outputs from Oncotarget
#5,949
of 8,690 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#217,670
of 257,661 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Oncotarget
#161
of 174 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,160,820 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,690 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 257,661 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 174 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.