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The lncRNAs PCGEM1 and PRNCR1 are not implicated in castration resistant prostate cancer

Overview of attention for article published in Oncotarget, March 2014
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  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

peer_reviews
1 peer review site

Citations

dimensions_citation
83 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
58 Mendeley
Title
The lncRNAs PCGEM1 and PRNCR1 are not implicated in castration resistant prostate cancer
Published in
Oncotarget, March 2014
DOI 10.18632/oncotarget.1846
Pubmed ID
Authors

John R. Prensner, Anirban Sahu, Matthew K. Iyer, Rohit Malik, Benjamin Chandler, Irfan A. Asangani, Anton Poliakov, Ismael A. Vergara, Mohammed Alshalalfa, Robert B. Jenkins, Elai Davicioni, Felix Y. Feng, Arul M. Chinnaiyan

Abstract

Long noncoding RNAs (IncRNAs) are increasingly implicated in cancer biology, contributing to essential cancer cell functions such as proliferation, invasion, and metastasis. In prostate cancer, several lncRNAs have been nominated as critical actors in disease pathogenesis. Among these, expression of PCGEM1 and PRNCR1 has been identified as a possible component in disease progression through the coordination of androgen receptor (AR) signaling (Yang et al., Nature 2013, see ref. [1]). However, concerns regarding the robustness of these findings have been suggested. Here, we sought to evaluate whether PCGEM1 and PRNCR1 are associated with prostate cancer. Through a comprehensive analysis of RNA-sequencing data (RNA-seq), we find evidence that PCGEM1 but not PRNCR1 is associated with prostate cancer. We employ a large cohort of >230 high-risk prostate cancer patients with long-term outcomes data to show that, in contrast to prior reports, neither gene is associated with poor patient outcomes. We further observe no evidence that PCGEM1 nor PRNCR1 interact with AR, and neither gene is a component of AR signaling. Thus, we conclusively demonstrate that PCGEM1 and PRNCR1 are not prognostic lncRNAs in prostate cancer and we refute suggestions that these lncRNAs interact in AR signaling.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 58 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Korea, Republic of 1 2%
Hungary 1 2%
Unknown 56 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 22%
Student > Master 9 16%
Other 4 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 7%
Other 6 10%
Unknown 7 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 34%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 16 28%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 12%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 11 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 January 2016.
All research outputs
#3,511,081
of 7,054,473 outputs
Outputs from Oncotarget
#1,979
of 6,462 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#166,680
of 319,659 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Oncotarget
#214
of 739 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,054,473 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,462 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 319,659 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 739 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.